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ALL CREDIT TO KURT

Kurt Jewson (selfie): ‘It’s too important for me to be vain about’

A local businessmen battling prostate cancer after a GP missed his symptoms has gone online to raise awareness about the disease.

Kurt Jewson, who founded Helston baby clothes success story Frugi with his wife Lucy, is fighting a cancer so advanced its severity is ranked nine out of a maximum grade of ten.

This week he posted a picture of himself with catheter and colostomy bag – part of the medical apparatus required to treat the disease – online.

It’s gone viral, with 80,000 Facebook shares and counting.

Kurt said in a moving statement: “It’s too important for me to be vain about”

Kurt’s story is that a year and a half ago, aged 43, he went to his GP with blood in his urine – but was dismissed as having a urine infection.

A year later he came back with further health complaints and was diagnosed with the killer disease responsible.

By then the cancer had spread to the point of being almost inoperable.

Public awareness about prostate cancer is significantly lower than for breast cancer, the comparable cancer for women.

Luckily for Kurt there is still hope, as a London specialist has agreed to go against the agreed opinion of local doctors and embark upon treatment.

One out of eight of all men die of Prostate Cancer and misdiagnosis is sadly not uncommon.

Although prostate cancer kills approximately as many men as breast cancer does women, research into the disease receives half as much funding.

Kurt hopes his post will raise awareness at grass roots and help change public attitudes to tackling the killer affliction.

Here’s the 44 year old businessman’s full post about his condition:

“Ok, have been thinking about this for a while.

Here I am in all my tubby, pale & middle aged (I’m 44) glory.

I’ve got a Catheter, Stoma ( colostomy bag ), scars where you can see them, scars where you can’t, and hormone implants below my skin.

I have another operation to come, and then radio and/or chemo therapy.

Why am I posting this?

Well, in the summer of 2014 I had blood in my urine. Went to the GP and he said that it was probably just an infection and would clear up.

It did.

However, it wasn’t an infection. It was a symptom of Prostate Cancer.

If my GP had simply taken some blood, and sent it off for a PSA test ( the test for prostate cancer…it’s NOT a finger up the ass… That comes later! ) then we would have caught this at an early, and much more manageable stage.

There are many symptoms. I urge all the men to spend 5 minutes here
http://prostatecanceruk.org/

It could save your life.

Prostate cancer is becoming more prevalent in ‘younger’ men. Men our age.

If you have blood in your urine, or any other symptom listed on prostateUK’s website, then get a blood PSA test.

Insist upon it.

If I had known earlier, then my treatment and prognosis would have been so different.

As it was, my cancer was free to grow and grow for another 12 months without anyone knowing.

So, there you go.

Sorry to be so serious, but 1 in 8 of you (for that’s how many men will get prostate cancer) will bloody thank me one day!

Cheers

Kurt

Ps

Feel free to share, if you want. It’s too important for me to be vain about.

At the moment Kurt’s expert treatment of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is on hold due to septaecemia taking hold after surgery.

His wife Lucy, who he says has been his ‘rock’ throughout, is juggling their business concerns, raising their two children, and visiting her husband in London.

Kurt told the local press he doesn’t blame the doctor who misdiagnosed him.

He said: “Hopefully, with other patients, he will scratch his head and not just dismiss them. I know he must feel terrible about it.”

Prostate is the fourth most common of all cancers, but comes twentieth in the league table of annual cancer research spending.

To share this story on Facebook just click the emblem below this article. To donate to Prostate Cancer Research click HERE



Posted by on January 31, 2016. Filed under NEWS. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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